Australian Brewery – National Pride and Canned Craft Beer

Australian_Brewery

Australia Trade Tasting Profiles Craft Beer exhibitor Australian Brewery.

Founded in 2010, Australian Brewery is a state of the art facility full of clean, sleek stainless steal.  The brew room is quite impressive and makes you wonder if it was built to reflect their dedication to canning, a signature characteristic of Australian Brewery.

Australian quickly gained market traction as their line-up of unique canned beers won multiple awards and their dedication to building a fan base of die-hard consumers won them support around the country. From it’s canning line to it’s front office, the brewery is purpose built to produce some of Australia’s choice beers and ciders.

We had the chance to talk with Australian Brewery owner Marcello Colisimo on the rapid rise of Australian Brewery and his plans for it’s future.

Why is it that Australian Brewery strictly cans their beer and cider line-up?

It was an easy decision really, as a craft Brewer you are always
looking for the ways to ensure your beer remains as fresh as possible
for as long as possible. I mean in an ideal world everybody would be
drinking straight from our tanks, but after extensive research the next
best option was to package in cans. Zero light (preventing UV light
breaking down the delicate flavours.) Less oxygen pickup during
packaging than bottles and no oxygen leaks once inside (unlike bottles.)
Not applicable to taste but important to us as a company is the
environmental benefit, cans are lighter so leave a smaller carbon
footprint and have a higher recycling rate than bottles. So all-in-all,
cans were an easy choice for protecting our award winning beers.

Tell us more about the Canbassador competition, what was the overall response from your audience?  It looks like you guys really boosted your brand recognition with the program.

Canbassador for us was about educating consumers on the benefits of
cans and connecting to a key target demographic of a young, creative,
socially engaged craft beer drinker. In a cluttered Australian craft
beer market it had an overwhelming response, converting casual drinkers
into passionate supporters of our beers and brand.

Australian Brewery takes part in a lot of local and national events.  What message do you guys try and get out into the world when you are exhibiting?

Part of being a micro – craft brewery is about getting in consumers
faces and having them taste our beers. We have one of the highest medal
rates of any brewery in the country with champions trophies, and many
best in class awards; including two this year for our Pale Ale (Best in
class Australian Pale Ale CBIA / AIBA.) So we know customers will love
it, we just need to let them taste it. And the easiest way of getting in
front of a lot of people at once is trade shows and exhibitions. It also
helps that consumers at these events are already engaged.

You also spend a lot of time doing tasting at retail accounts – what do you find works best building support in your distribution channels?

As a small producer we don’t have the ability to provide rebates to
lock in stockists and tap share like the big multi nationals. So we have
to get pretty creative with our accounts. Tastings are very important
and we run them weekly, but we also offer staff incentives etc. However
what works best, and what we love to do the most is to bring the venues
staff out to the Brewery for lunch, a brewery tour and of course beers
with our head brewer. This gives the staff the confidence to sell our
products. In our experience if the staff love it, they will pass that on
to consumers.

How are you planning on taking advantage of your presence at Australia Trade Tasting?

We have begun exporting our beers to Japan with quite a lot of success.

The next stage of our distribution is to take this further with an eye
to meet distributors for other Asian countries and America. We are also
looking to boost our national distribution in Australia. AuTT looks to
be a great place to connect with a variety of industry leaders in the
distribution game.

Australian Brewery has built a successful national brand over the course of a few years. As they continue to grow and build markets around the world, they will be spreading their passion for their namesake country.  They’ve put themselves in an exciting position to represent both Australia and craft beer together and are poised to be a bright spot in the industry for decades to come.

AuTT_Banner_Wine_MagAre you a beer distributor looking to source new and innovative Australian craft beers? Get Involved at Australia Trade Tasting.

In Depth Data Analysis on the Craft Beer Industry in Australia from David Lipman, Founder/Director of Drinks Hub

 David_Lipman_SpeakerDrinks_Hub

Australia Trade Tasting gets in-depth insight into the Australian Craft Beer and Cider Industry from David Lipman, Founder of Beer and Brewer Magazine and Drinks Hub.

The Craft Beer and Cider Industry has seen steady growth in Australia over the past decade.  With it’s increased popularity, more and more offerings are popping up as novice and pro brewers take their passion to the marketplace.  While excited consumers rejoice because of the extra options in bars and retail stores across the country, trade professionals question the industry’s capacity and wonder if the market is saturated.  We caught up with one of the industry’s leading professionals, David Lipman, to get his perspective.

Here is our Q & A with David and his interpretation of the most recent Australian craft beer and cider industry data available today.

What Craft trends are appearing in Australia? 

1. On-premise, premiumisation, drinking less, spending more
Barscan who report on around 3% of on-premise sales trends across Australia, said in the three months to March 2014, 45% of pubs in the BarScan sample set had a craft beer available on tap with the growth from the previous three months to December 2013 being 20%.

In the three months to October 2014 56% of pubs in the BarScan sample set had a craft beer available on tap with the growth from the three months to March 2014 being 24% (representing a 6-month growth period).

With this growing trend of craft beer on tap, Barscan says “Craft Beer is the fastest growing beer segment in pubs, largely due to the growth in taps, and being sold at a price premium”. March figures from BarScan reported Volume of beer in pubs was -2.2%, while value was +1.6%. Dramatically in the UK volumes were -6.5% year on year), interestingly in the USA volumes were +1% (over a 10 year period 2002-2012). Looking at share of draught beer versus total beer, in the USA draught is only 10% (cans being 65%), whereas in Australia and the UK it’s more like 48% draught.

I am seeing more venues open being dedicated (themed) to craft beer, more craft beer events such as Tap Takeovers, Festivals, Dinners and Meet the Brewer Tastings. Some craft beers are being packaged only in kegs, being exclusively available in pubs, so as to provide pubs a point of difference to the off-premise, and allowing brewers to collaborate with venues on recipe development (e.g. Bridge Road Brewers, Beechworth Vic). Also in pubs I see the growth of House Beers, where an individual pub will work with a brewer to produce their own brand of beer, with the style to meet their customer’s tastes and provide more margin to the pub. E.g. Opera Bar (Sydney NSW) Organic Ale by Redoak, NSW and Sail & Anchor Hotel (Fremantle WA) from Feral Brewing, WA. Pubs are also improving their food/bistro offering to pair with the diverse spectrum of flavour in craft beer, which is helping attract more customers and increase spend per customer.

Looking at growth in pubs having a craft beer and/or cider on tap, according to BarScan, craft beer is growing twice as fast as cider in pubs, with 24% growth for craft beer versus 12% for cider, in the three months to October 2014.

2. On-premise Consumer Insights, from Drinks Hub survey of Beer & Brewer magazine readership in March 2014

Consumers demand four different craft beer brands per month in pubs
That’s up to 50 different beers per year – if only one tap dedicated to craft, then it needs to be rotated weekly. According to Barscan, the average sell through of a keg of craft beer per week is 75% of a keg, which needs to be 100% to allow for one keg sold per week, to ensure beer freshness, quality and paying its way. Some specialty craft beer venues are selling 300-500 different beers per year.

80% want to try a new craft beer when they visit the pub
The challenge is only 33% of craft beer drinkers visit the pub weekly – therefore pubs need to offer at least two different craft beers per month to appease the craft beer drinkers’ repertoire and keep them coming back to their venue.
100% of respondents want craft beer on tap
At least one craft beer tap in every pub, as respondents are spread all over Australia. Venues have on average 8 taps, and if one needs to be craft beer, it’s up to the publican to ensure their tap contracts or suppliers have the selection to appease their customer’s current tastes and preferences and entice new customers with updates to the tap bank seasonally or by occasions.

60% want craft beer to be more affordable on-premise
Excise on beer packaged in kegs (49.5 litres) is 40% less than beer packaged in kegs or bottles (less than 49.5 litres). However with high labour costs and rent, craft beer on tap is too expensive in the eyes of 60% of respondents. Craft beer prices are competitive from the large brands; however it’s the smaller craft brands that are not able to be price competitive due to much smaller production volumes. The trend of consumers drinking less and spending more (on craft beer and premium imported brands), comes down to do the top 20-30 craft brands on-premise receiving most of the volume growth, as they have the tap space. It’s one thing for a small craft beer to gain a tap, however the higher wholesale price leads to the consumer paying more, drinking less, and then that tap not selling as much as other taps and making the publican need to try other craft beers, or essentially keep that tap rotating to appease the consumers that want to taste 2-4 different brands a month in pubs.

3. Limited retail space and the importance of distributor relationships
With 3,000 plus local and imported beers available in Australia, and retail space to accommodate these beers being limited in on-premise to on average eight taps and 30 bottles, and in off-premise 150 bottles, it means the market is highly competitive and retailers wanting to deal more and more with distributors that represent a portfolio of craft beer, rather than the individual brand owners themselves. Local breweries entering the wholesale market that need to hit around 1.5 million litres a year to generate decent profits, need to consider their distribution model to maximize volumes, be that via a distributor, wholesaler, direct via their own sales force, or direct with retailers. Brewpubs or cellar doors are of course a guaranteed distribution channel, albeit a high capital investment.

The strong Australian dollar and growth in consumer repertoire drinkers has greatly attributed to the high number of imported beers available in Australia, not to mention the ease of access from parallel importing.

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Is Cider going to continue to be a popular category in Australia?

IRI-Aztec, who are Australia’s leaders in off-premise sales stats, state on the popularity of the Cider category, “Whilst we are seeing volume declines in Total Liquor in the Australian off-premise we are still seeing value growth as shoppers consume less, but are willing to pay more. Cider continues to be the stand out with strong growth of the last few years. Although this growth is not as high as it has been it appears to be holding at a very healthy rate (double digit). In the last 12 months we have seen 11% value growth in the category. We have seen recently that volume growth has overtaken value growth as the key driver within Cider”.

BarScan, who lead the industry in on-premise sales stats in Australia, state that a pub is more likely to have a cider on tap than a craft beer. In the three months to March 2014, 67% of pubs in their sample set had a cider available on tap, compared to 45% for craft beer. Now in the three months to October 2014, 75% of pubs having a cider on tap. The trend here is showing cider is getting closer to 100% of venues having a cider on tap, and hence still a popular category in Australia.

Cider will continue its growth, however it should be mentioned that cider can take many forms, based in the amount of juice or concentrate used in the base cider, and as a generalization the huge growth in cider, particularly off-premise, is thanks to Rekordelig and the Swedish ciders. Given Barscan’s stats it appears cider may be slowing its growth, albeit off a large base.

2. Where do you see potential for budding craft companies?

Distribution
Local craft brewers and distributors of imported beers alike, may like to focus on non-traditional liquor retailers, such as restaurants, clubs and hotels – which represent a far bigger number of licensed venues (38,000 in NSW and Vic alone for example) compared to the traditional liquor store or hotel licenses, with approx. 23,000 across Australia.

I believe craft brewers should focus on restaurants, as their beer lists are small, meaning the chances of getting picked are much better than in a bottleshop or pub, plus once you’re on the list, and the beer is selling each week, why would the restaurant change? More chefs and sommeliers are realizing that beer has a much broader spectrum of flavour than wine, and hence is an excellent match to any food on any menu, be that to complement, cleanse or contrast the food flavours.

Alternative routes to market for craft brewers are standalone draught beer systems that can operate on bars, in function rooms, and so on. These also work for non-traditional liquor outlets such as cafes and restaurants that done have any taps installed, nor the space or budget.

It’s interesting also the new Dan Murphy’s connections online platform that allows suppliers to sell their complete portfolio, rather than only what Dan’s could fit on the physical store floor. Drop shipping is a scenario many online retailers offer to share the risk of retail sales with suppliers.

Styles of beer and packaging
As at July 2014 sales data, IRI-Aztec, who gain sales data from most independent and banner group off-premise retailers nationally, say, “we are seeing Mid-strength, Premium Imported brands and Craft the real drivers of growth in Beer with the other segments in decline”. “We have seen a number of new multipack SKUs being introduced recently ncluding 10, 12 and 18 packs. It is very early days, so we don’t have any reliable performance information, however consumers are becoming more and more driven by convenience and occasion based purchasing, which would suggest an opportunity for new pack formats that cater to this”.

Diversifying
There is a trend of craft brewers branching out to craft distilling, plus distillers not just focusing on whisky or gin, or vodka, but producing all three. If it’s hard enough maintaining retailer relationships and distribution, then craft brewers look at offering their loyal customers another craft product from their company. E.g. Young Henrys in Newtown NSW.

Social Media, Online Marketing
Doing the online basics well is very cost effective for budding craft companies – such as having the social media handles as the same name as the brand across all the social media channels, ensuring the brand has a regular eNewsletter and/or blog, plus keeps their web site up to date with events, new releases and awards. Some venues have an App when and what new beer is going on tap, when bottled beer menu changes, events dates, etc. which is excellent marketing. E.g. The Wheatsheaf Hotel in Adelaide SA.

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Is there encouraging data in on-premise channels, tastings, etc.?

Yes there is very encouraging sales data in on-premise, as mentioned above. However there may be only 20-30 brands that see the sales from this data.

Yes tastings are the way to build a brand, and have a direct positive impact on sales. Dan Murphy’s seem to be the champions of in-store tastings, and while previously brands were said to be built on-premise, it’s now a case of any venue, either on- or off-premise that engages new customers with products via tastings, will see a positive impact on brand awareness and sales.

3. Is Craft Beer finding new retail homes easily as competition increases with the number of brewery offerings continuing to grow?

Australia is already saturated with 200 breweries (approximately 290 beer brands), from a per capita perspective, compared to 3000 breweries in the USA for example. This number isn’t too high, however when imports are factored in, as mentioned previously, the number of beers grows to 3,000+, making the competition fierce and the ability for individual brands to grow very challenging.

As mentioned above, given craft beer on tap in pubs is growing at 24% during the three months to October 2014, it may seem craft beer is finding new homes easily, however I believe this is very much only enjoyed by the top 20-30 selling craft beers, given most pubs only have eight taps, these beer brands have the ability to supply large volumes at competitive prices and are willing to promote their products with pubs (i.e. offer contracts, rebates, equipment, point of sale, promotional dollars, etc.). I believe craft beer as a generalization for all sizes of craft brewers are finding new retail homes in pubs relatively easy in selling 1-2 kegs, or a pallet of kegs for one month on a guest tap. The problem is once that keg sells or that month is over, the brewer loses that tap and they are left needing to find another venue, meaning growing draught beer volumes is very difficult.

Specialty Beer off-premise venues are proving great retail homes for craft beer, from large fridge space, growlers and events, such as Warners at the Bay (NSW), Plonk (ACT) and Mane Liquor (WA) however these are few and far between when you pool them with the 9,000 off-premise shops nationally.

There is a lot going for imported beer in Australia, given the economies of scale, and consumer willingness to pay more for international beer.

Imported beer in Australia is a good profit margin for importers and distributors; given the average retail (off-premise, looking at random online retail prices for an 8 litre carton of craft beer) price incl. GST for international craft beer of $74 is 13% higher than local craft beer at $64.50. Importers are buying imported craft beer at an average $17.50 (Drinks Hub wholesaler research) per carton (24x330mL) when the average ex-works local craft beer carton is approximately $30 ex excise, representing imported craft beer as a 42% saving. When you add the International craft retail price premium of 13% (approx. $6.50) to the 42% wholesale price saving (approx. $12.50), that means distributors of imported craft beers are approx. $19 per carton better off, not taking into account customs, warehousing and freight, etc. costs.

Craft_Beer_data_Australia

Given Australia is only 1% of global beer consumption, local craft brewers will never be able to compete with imported craft beer as imported beer being brewed in the USA, Asia and the EU/UK is able to be brewed at much larger annual volumes to gain brewing efficiencies where the cost per carton will always be better than local craft beer wholesale prices. And it doesn’t cost much to freight beer ambient around the world. The largest fixed cost apart from the liquid, for local brewers in Australia is excise (it’s drastically less in the USA for example).

If Government excise on craft brewers in Australia wasn’t so high, it would help local craft brewers’ profit margins and ideally they pass on those savings to retailers, thereby becoming more price competitive (if they scale down their wholesale prices that is) – then as volumes grow, the local craft brewer gains brewing efficiencies and perhaps the Government charges a higher rate of excise. The flip side is, this may encourage even more entrants to the local brewing scene, and craft brewers don’t pass on the savings in excise.

Australia is already saturated with breweries per capita, when compared to the USA. We need the existing beer brands selling more, so they are more sustainable, and if more price competitive to imports this will help, particularly when 60% of consumers from the Drinks Hub research of Beer & Brewer magazine readers in March 2014 want craft beer to be more affordable at the pub.

This case study justifies why so many small craft brewers and associations in Australia lobby the Government for excise tax reform. It comes down to will the Government ever see a net benefit from excise tax reform? Surely there can be, just like income tax-free thresholds, why not have a volumetric tax system based on annual production volumes with rebates (more like $300,000 not the current $30,000) for local brewers (and free trade agreement country members)?

I strongly advise budding entrants to the craft beer space to do their due diligence in business planning on deciding on the retail or wholesale market for sales. If wholesale to budget in tough competition from tap contracts, parallel importing, high excise and the growing retail liquor home brands, all competing for shelf space.

4. What resources do breweries that are looking to export have at their disposal?

Brewers have Government agencies Austrade and DFAT, and brewing associations (ARCBA and CBIA) as industry resources to help them with preparations for export and join in Embassy and Trade tastings/shows abroad. I have recently launched Drinks Hub, which is an Exporter of Australian Premium Drinks, being craft beer, cider, gin, whisky, wine sachets.

It’s important to mention that many Australian beer brands have tried/dabbled in export, and don’t seem to pursue it, as the initial orders don’t turn into repeat orders – mainly due to price as mentioned above. I recommend only largely produced craft beers consider exporting as they can be most price competitive and gain enough volume to fill up containers and make it worth their while. Drinks Hub can help brands export who don’t plan on exporting a great deal, or large craft brands export and assist growing their local brewing volumes to improve local wholesale pricing and profit margins.

5. Where do you see the craft industry in five years?

With distribution growing on- and off-premise giving consumers access to more craft beer and consumer tastes being more and more educated, the craft beer industry in Australia in five years will be higher than what it is today, and if I take a guess I think approx. 6% of total volume (or at least value). I hope in five years every pub in Australia has at least one craft beer available on tap (guest/rotating or regular), as craft beer drinkers are all over regional and metro Australia and pubs wouldn’t want to be alienating prospective customers. I hope the number of local beer brands stays around 300, so that the increase in volume benefits the existing, and allows them to be more price competitive and profitable.

Many of the Australian Whisky brands cannot keep up with demand both locally and export, and therefore with the growth in craft distilling, I see a lot of excess demand being available for these new entrants as the existing brands struggle to fulfill existing demand.

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David Lipman, Bio

David’s passion for beer began in 2002 as a Cellarman at The Whitehorse on Parson’s Green and The Porterhouse Covent Garden, two institutions for great local and imported beer in London. In 2007 David founded Beer & Brewer magazine and www.beerandbrewer.com, and finished up as Publisher/Editor in May 2014. David has published as Editor-in-Chief five books on beer, including Ultimate Beer Guide Australia & NZ (2011), Craft Beer Trade Buyers Guide (2012), Breweries of Australia: A History 2nd Edn (2012), Best 100 Beers Australia (2013) and Beer Buyers’ Guide Australia & NZ (2013) www.beerbuyersguide.com.au. David has also published booklets on beer & food matching for Beer & Brewer magazine and BBQ School. David has launched three beer events including Beer & Brewer Expo (2009, Melbourne), Beer & Brewer Awards (2010, Sydney) and Beer & Brewer Conference (2012, Melbourne). These days David continues his passion hosting corporate tastings (including at the Sydney Opera House and Taste Festivals Australia). David has also just launched Drinks Hub, an exporter of Australian premium drinks, including craft beer, cider, spirits.

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Are you a craft beer or cider brand looking to expand your distribution and grow brand recognition?  Get involved and network with top industry buyers and media  at Australia Trade Tasting.

Beer Competitions in Australia

Beer Distributors in Australia

Here is a list of the Leading Beer Competitions in Australia.  Exhibit your brands and connect around the country!

Australian International Beer Awards

Australian_International_Beer_Awards

The AIBA is Presented annually by the Royal Agricultural Society (RASV) in partnership with Federation University Australia.

The Australian International Beer Awards (AIBA) is the largest competition of its kind in the Asia Pacific region and is renowned for celebrating beer and brewing excellence in Australia and around the world.

The AIBA provides brewers with an opportunity to benchmark their beers against international industry standards and aims to create greater consumer awareness of the quality and diversity of beer styles available in Australia and internationally.

For further information regarding the Australian International Beer Awards please email events@rasv.com.au or call +61 3 9281 7444.

Australian Amateur Brewing Championship

Australian_Amateur_Brewing_Championships

The first national competition of the ABAA (Amateur Brewers Association of
Australia) was held in Sydney in 1995 in conjunction with the Ausbeer Homebrew
Expo organised by Colin Penrose. The call for entries was publicised in the magazine Ausbeer and entries were judged over several days/evenings preceding the Expo by a number of Sydney judges.

A rather informal body (the AABA – Australian Amateur Brewing Association) with
self-appointed delegates from some of the states has been responsible for deciding on
the rules and categories for the AABC, which has been run by a local organising
committee.

For more information please the website http://www.aabc.org.au/

Western Australian State Amateur Brewers Competition

Western_Australian_State_Amateur_Brewers_Competition

The 2014 WA State Amateur Brewers Competition (WASABC) started in 2007 by a group of dedicated amateur brewers, to offer Western Australian brewers a chance to compete at National level, at the Australian Amateur Brewing Championship (AABC).

WASABC offers you the platform to challenge your skills amongst the best brewers in the State, and get invaluable feedback from our BJCP certified judges. Whether you win or not, this feedback will help you to become a better brewer, raise the overall skill level in our State, and ultimately help developing Award winning brews.

The WASABC Organiser(s) are independent volunteer(s), who each year, work tirelessly to offer all WA amateur brewers the opportunity to showcase their pride and joy at State and National level, at the AABC, and show the country that Western Australians can brew fantastic beers!

WA is blessed with some of the best professional brewers in the country, nearly all of them started as home brewers, and we hope that WASABC contributes to nurture the next generation of professional craft brewers!

Sydney Royal Beer & Cider Show

Sydney_Royal_Beer_and_Cider_Competition

The Sydney Royal competitions showcase Australia’s finest produce and award the best of the best with a coveted Sydney Royal medal.

This is a fantastic opportunity to submit your finest products to benchmark them against the rest of this high-growth industry. The 2014 Show received the most number of entries ever in the history of the Competition and awarded a record eight Gold Medals and three Championships.

Vicbrew

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Vicbrew; The voice of  Craft Brewers in Victoria.

Vicbrew was established in 1995 as an informal committee primarily set-up to organise and run a Victorian Amateur/Craft/Home Brewing competition and assist with the organisation and running an Australian Amateur/Craft/Home Brewing competition. It’s members are representatives of various Victorian Home Brewing Clubs and so can provide a means of communication between the Clubs which facilitates a co-ordination of Club activities. As a secondary role, Vicbrew will, finances permitting, encourage the novice brewer by providing sponsorship of a “Best Novice Brewer” prize at sanctioned Victorian Amateur/Craft/Home Brewing competitions.

BeerFest

BEERFEST

Beerfest is held in February of each year and is organised by The Melbourne Brewers. Melbourne’s oldest Craft Brewing Club based in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs.

Beerfest is a weekend event, commencing on the Friday afternoon and finishing up on the Sunday afternoon. While beer judging dominates proceedings, other social activities are organised. Visitors are welcome to come along and view the judging and sample the beers coming off the judging tables.

2015 starts a new chapter in Beerfest history with the event moving to The Royal George Hotel in Kyneton Victoria.

Exhibit_at_Australia_Trade_Tasting

If you are a craft brewery looking to exhibit your brands in front of wholesalers, importers and distributors get involved at Australia Trade Tasting.

Melbourne Gin Company: How a Local Craft Distillery Found a National Following.

Melbourne_Gin_Company_AuTT

How Andrew Marks’ passion gave Melbourne’s favourite local distillery, Melbourne Gin Company (MGC), a national home.

In many ways, The Melbourne Gin Company’s success is a product of it’s honest branding.  The classic bottle and bold, lower-case branding – mgc – has become iconic on bar rails across the country. Even though every bottle abides by simplistic marketing and spartan branding, the brand is anything but forgettable. Every time you see a bottle it subtly reminds you, “Oh, You forgot about me did you? Go on, dabble again.”

AuTT interviews Andrew Marks and gets insight into the road that MGC traveled to go national.

Andrew Marks created the Melbourne Gin Company with one idea in mind – to produce great gin.  He didn’t start out with a business plan or any gimmicks to get people on board, he just wanted to produce a gin that he was proud to label ‘Melbourne Gin Company.’   True to his desire, Andrew kept at work and experimented with countless ingredients until he perfected his gin.

Today he offers gin lovers a taste of his passion as MGC, a blend of juniper, sandalwood, orange and grapefruit peel distilates, (as well as a few others!) that make MGC a balanced, earthy bodied gin full of citric aromas and lingering herbal aromatics.

1.  MGC is proud of their origins.  Was it hard finding recognition outside of Melbourne?

Melbourne is a cultural melting pot, internationally recognized for its cosmopolitan forward thinking lifestyle. People around Australia and further afield understand that and we have found that, along with great production values, everybody is ready to embrace a product that encapsulates the idea of a bringing people and cultures together.  We’ve had such a great response across Australia and we couldn’t be more proud of our product and it’s origin.

2.  What are some of the more successful support strategies you guys have used to build your brand?

We have an online presence through social media that works wonders at connecting with the consumer.  Our team is tirelessly, communicating and giving back as much energy as we receive from our devoted fans.

At the MGC we believe that giving back to the community is extremely important.  We have been involved with the sponsorship of many local events, which reach a broad cross section of the community, as well as lots of events and charitable shows. It has been great aligning the MGC with organisations and businesses that share a common ethos and we try our hardest to find worthy partners ready to share in our passions.

3.  What do you think it is about MGC that draws the attention of the consumer?

At first, it’s the clean lines of our classic design, and clear strong branding, but the litmus test (pardon the distiller trade talk) really is the taste of the product. We spent a year developing the flavour profile and recipe.  If people buy a second bottle it is because it tastes good, not because of the branding.

4.  Micro-distilleries, and the craft industry as a whole, have really become popular. What shape do you see the market taking in the next five years and what advice do you have for small and medium sized distilleries trying to find a healthy niche moving forward?

The market is morphing as we speak. It is a very exciting space to be a part of right now. The market will continue to develop and offer many interesting and different products.  There will be some that catch the consumer strictly based on the branding and others that offer truly unique varieties.  If consumers speak loud enough, there is no limit to where the distillers will go and what they will come up with.  I think the main focus for us, as distillers, is to ensure that our products continue to taste good.

The Melbourne Gin Company has grown from a singular beginning. Every bottle proves itself a testament to Andrew’s dedication to his trade and MGC’s growth and popularity comes on the back of his vision to make his passion into a reality. The next time you go and pick up a bottle of MGC, remember Andrew’s credo, “If people buy a second bottle it’s because it tastes good.”

Australia Trade Tasting

Are you an adult beverage brand importer, distributor or wholesaler looking to source craft distilleries for your portfolio?  Get Involved at Australia Trade Tasting and connect with innovative new Aussie brands.

 

Whisky Distilleries in Australia

List_of_Australian_Whisky_Distilleries

This is the first part (A-L) of a complete list of Australian Whiskies.

Bakery Hill

As with all classic single malt whiskies, Bakery Hill Distillery use only malted barley, yeast and water to ensure the true classic flavour and aroma of real single malt whisky.

Bakery Hill believes the addition of caramel dulls and mutes the exceptionally fine flavour and nose of malts so, nlike many other malt whiskies, no caramel is added to improve the appearance.

1/20 Gatwick Rd
Nth Bayswater Victoria 3153
Phone: +61 3 9761 7216, Fax: +61 3 9761 7216, Contact David Baker directly on 0408 705 770

Belgrove Distillery

The Belgrove Distillery is the only Rye Distillery in Australia. Located North of Hobart, Belgrove Distillery is also the only biodiesel powered distillery in the world and one of very few Whisky distilleries that grows all its own grain, malts, ferments, distills and barrel ages on site.

The copper still was handmade from scratch. Belgrove takes pride in it’s dedication to quality products and sustainable production.

3121 Midland Highway, Kempton, Tasmania Australia 7030.
Mob  0409 144 560   |   Int +61 409 144 560

Black Gate Distillery

The Black Gate Distillery  make high quality spirits from local grains and fruits, while providing a unique tasting experience for enthusiasts and the overtly curious.

They operate an online store and produce three spirits: Quandong Liqueur; Lemon Vodka; and Lime Vodka. They are open for visits by appointment.

72 Forest Road, MENDOORAN NSW Australia 2842 

Tel. 02 6886 1123, Mob. 0429 978 822

Bluestill Distillery

Bluestill Distillery offers a great line-up of diverse spirits:

James Bentley – Whisky, Black Widow – Bourbon, Red Kelpie – Sweet Dark Rum, Trafalgar – Gin, Young Drop – Brandy, Double Up – Vodka, Chiapas – Tequila, Young Drop – Slivovitz, Young Drop – Grappa, Black Widow Bourbon and Cola RTD’s.

They also have a restaurant which can seat up to 90 people. With panoramic views of the township of Young, you can enjoy country-style cuisine, either indoors or al fresco.

Kingsvale to 161 Henry Lawson Way, township of Young, info@bluestill.com.au, Phone +61 2 6382 2200
Fax No  +61 2 6382 4170

Great Southern Distilling Company (Limeburners Single Malt Whisky)

Great Southern Distilling Company is a boutique distillery, producing premium quality spirits using time honoured techniques and traditional copper pot stills. They are also Home of the Nationally and Internationally awarded Limeburners Single Malt Whisky.

Limeburners Whisky is produced and bottled by hand. By world standards they are a tiny operation… which is the way they like it.

Cellar Door and Distillery
252 Frenchman Bay Rd, Robinson, Albany, WA 6330
E-mail: 
manager@distillery.com.au
Phone:   +61 8 9842 5363    

Mailing Address 
PO Box 1597,  Albany WA 6331

Marketing and Distribution
E-mail: 
brent@distillery.com.au 

Hellyers Road Distillery

Hellyers Road is Australia’s largest single malt whisky distillery, but they really don’t feel that big. They think big and act big, but when compared to Europe’s finest, they’re actually quite small. And that’s good, because it keeps them trying hard to produce Australia’s very best single malt whiskies..

Address: 153 Old Surrey Road, (PO BOX 1415), Burnie, Tasmania 7320, Australia.

Phone : 03 6433 0439

Int’l : +61 3 6433 0439

Fax : +61 3 6433 1094

Email : sales@hellyersroaddistillery.com.au 

Joadja Whisky Distillery

Joadja Whisky Distillery is located in the Southern Highlands of New South Wales, Australia. The town of Joadja was established in the late 1870’s by the Austrailian Kerosene Oil and Mineral Co. and the hundreds of Scottish oil shale miners who brought with them their skills in the mining and retorting techniques……  and the stilling of “sly grog.”

1760 Joadja Road, Joadja, New South Wales, 2575 Australia.

(02) 4878-5129, info@joadjawhisky.com.au

Lark Distillery

Lark Distillery is an Australian single malt whisky, proudly unique in character and style, crafted in small batches exclusively from pure Tasmanian ingredients, matured in small barrels, hand-bottled by whisky lovers in Tasmania for whisky lovers world-wide.

40 Denholms Road, Cambridge, Tasmania, 7170, Australia.

Phone (03) 6321 9088 Fax (03) 6231 9082

Are you looking to source new Australian Whisky Distillers? Come and network with unique Australian distilleries ready to do business at Australia Trade Tasting.

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Craft Distilleries in Australia

Craft_Distilleries_in_Australia 

 

 

 

 

A List of Unique Craft Distilleries in Australia

The Australian Distillery

The Australian Distillery is Nestled amongst the picturesque rolling hills and pristine beaches of the Illawarra, The Australian Distillery produces premium world class spirits using only the finest Australian grains and the purest of waters.
Using unique blends of the finest ingredients, our spirits are hand crafted by a master distiller. Our traditional hand beaten copper pot stills capture the authentic flavours and aromas that truly reflect the highest standards of premium spirits.

Australian Spirits Distilling Co. Pty Ltd
PO Box 174, GERRINGONG NSW 2534
P: 02 4234 3555, F: 02 4234 3888, M: 0422 880 727, E: chris@theaustdistillery.com.au

Great Southern Distilling Company

Great Southern Distilling Company is a boutique distillery, producing premium quality spirits using time honoured techniques and traditional copper pot stills.
The distillery sits on the edge of the Princess Royal Harbour in Albany on the South West coast of Western Australia.  The beauty of the region is undeniable, forests tall and rich, beaches white and endless, rain fresh from melted Antarctic snow caps.
Using locally sourced ingredients of outstanding quality they produce small batches of hand crafted spirits. Limeburners Single Malt Whisky is produced from Southern Wheat Belt barley and the white spirits are distilled using grapes from the Great Southern and Margaret River wine regions.

252 Frenchman Bay Rd.,
Robinson, Albany, WA 6330
E-mail: manager@distillery.com.au
Phone: 08 9842 5363
Mailing Address: PO Box 1597, Albany WA 6331

Lark Distillery

Lark Distillery is an Australian single malt whisky, proudly unique in character and style, crafted in small batches exclusively from pure Tasmanian ingredients, matured in small barrels, hand-bottled by whisky lovers in Tasmania for whisky lovers world-wide.

Lark Distillery was the first licensed distillery in Tasmania since 1839. It was established in 1992 to produce  Australian malt whisky, rich in character with a big finish using Tasmanian ingredients

Phone 03 6231 9088, Fax: 03 6231 9082
Address: 14 Davey Street, Hobart 7000, Tasmania, Australia

Hoochery Distillery

Don’t be fooled by imitations – Hoochery Distillery claim to make the only Rum in Western Australia, With the red-eyed crocodile representing their regalia. They urge you to ask the other rums where they were really made, distilled and bottled — they can’t say Kununurra!

Distillery Telephone: 08 9168 2467, Office Telephone: 08 9168 2122,
Office Address: 300 Weaber Plains Road, Kununurra, 6743, WA, Postal Address: Po Box 497, Kununurra, 6743, WA

The West Winds Gin

The West Winds Gin is a gin lovers gin, set apart by utilizing native botanicals like wattle seed and bush tomato and the pristine waters of Margaret River in Western Australia.

“The West Winds” name is a tribute to the ocean breezes used for centuries by sailors to cross the Indian Ocean from South Africa to the west coast of Australia and beyond in a search for the riches of the new world.

Phone: 0412 THE GIN
Email: jeremy@thewestwindsgin.com

Kangaroo Island Spirits

Kangaroo Island Spirits makes premium Australian Gin, Vodka and Liqueurs. Their cellar door on Kangaroo Island offers tastings of our award winning range and is also the home to an 80lt copper pot still.

Premium spirits include their flagship gins; Wild Gin,O Gin and Mulberry Gin (seasonal product), as well as other spirits and liqueurs available.

856 Playford Highway
Cygnet River, South Australia, Australia
+61 408 818 012

Starward Distillery

STARWARD began with a simple vision: offer the world a modern whisky unshackled from tradition. This whisky is the culmination of nine years of research and development. Working with Australian barley and barrels they adjusted and re-adjusted distilling and maturation techniques from around the world – continually observing the influence of time, place and the natural elements.

STARWARD borrows from the past without being constrained by it, and combines it with the best Australia has to offer: barley, barrels, and climate.
This world class malt is a true reflection of the place and people who make it.

New World Whisky Distillery
181 Larkin Street
Essendon Fields VIC 3041
Tel. 03 9005 4420
info@standard.com.au

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