GLENN COOPER: Keynote speaker at the Australia Market Educational Conference

AuTT Header DatesWe are very excited to announce Glenn Cooper (Chairman, Cooper Brewery) as the first of our keynote lineup for AuTT Conference 2015!

speaker_GLENN_COOPERGlenn is the current Chairman of Coopers Brewing, Australia’s largest independent brewing company and named in 2011 as the world’s top family business in 2011. He was until June 2014 the Marketing Director of Coopers. He is also the current Chairman of Australian Made and Australian Grown.

Glenn will be talking on Managing and Growing Your Beer Brand: Specialist Brands Against The Global Breweries.

Glenn held the the responsibility of Marketing and oversaw the launch of numerous beers in the Coopers range, including Dark Ale, Extra Strong Vintage Ale, Mild Ale, Premium Lager, and more recently, Coopers Clear. Glenn will be sharing his insight on management and sales at the 2015 AuTT conference in September.

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AuTT Conference Tickets

 

Stuart Gregor To Speak On “How To Make People Fall In Love With Your Brand”

Stuart Gregor, Founder Of Liquid Ideas, Four Pillars Gin and President Of Australian Distillers Association to speak at AuTT Conference 2015!

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Responsible for innovative PR, communications, sales, launches, presenting and talking, Stuart is a veteran of 20 years in the drinks business and the world of lifestyle public relations and events. He has launched and promoted dozens of premium brands in wine, spirits and beer and his business ‘Liquid Ideas’ is one of Australia’s leading PR agencies.

We are excited to announce that Stuart Gregor has been added as a keynote speaker at the Australia Trade Tasting and Conference.

Stuart is a regular commentator on marketing and sits on the board of food rescue charity OzHarvest, chairs Australia’s Public Relations Council and follows every sporting code imaginable. He is obsessed by barrel aged gin and Negroni’s with a twist. Stuart is also the president of the Australian Distillers Association and Founder of Four Pillars Gin.

Come and Be Inspired by Stuart as he presents some genuinely honest ideas on “How to make people fall in love with your brand.

Looking to learn more on beer, spirits or wine sales and distribution? Get involved with Australia Trade Tasting educational conference on 1st and 2nd September in Melbourne.

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Australia’s First Families of Wine to launch in USA May 2015

Leading family wineries tour to showcase Australian wine heritage and modern diversity.

AFFW_LogoFounded in 2009, Australia’s First Families of Wine (AFFW) came together to work collectively to raise the profile and provenance of quality Australian wine, at home and around the world, through fine wine and heritage tastings, consumer and trade education and industry leadership.

The group consists of twelve of Australia’s prominent family wineries — Brown Brothers (1885), Campbells (1870), d’Arenberg (1912) , De Bortoli Wines (1928), Henschke (1868), Howard Park (1986), Jim Barry Wines (1959), McWilliam’s Wines (1877), Tahbilk (1860), Taylors (1969), Tyrrell’s Wines (1858) and Yalumba (1849).

Recently AFFW announced the appointment of Robert Hill-Smith from Yalumba as their new chairman. Hill-Smith assumes the chair from Mitchell Taylor of Taylors Wines and is the fourth chairman of the initiative. “Internationally, our mission is to educate, share and celebrate Australia’s fine wine heritage, quality, and diversity with wine enthusiasts around the world and encourage demand for Australian fine wines. Collectively we represent 16 wine regions, 4 states, 48 generations of winemakers and over 1,200 years of experience,” stated Hill-Smith.

Angela Slade, Regional Director Wine Australia North America enthuses, “Australia’s First Families of Wine is a showcase for the multi-generational story of Australian wine, from early days in the 1800s, through to the modern wine story from the 1950s, to the regional and stylistic evolution of today.” Slade continues, “This US launch, led by Robert Hill-Smith, represents both wine heritage and a look at Australia’s long-term sustainability well into the future.”

NORTH AMERICA TOUR – MAY 2015:
The tour, coordinated by Wine Australia, will include 13 events over 14 days in 5 cities across the USA and Canada. US launch events are planned for San Francisco (May 18) and New York (May 20) before heading to Canada for Montreal (May 21-22) Toronto (May 25-26) and Vancouver (May 28-30).

FAMILY MEMBERS ON TOUR 2015:
Robert Hill-Smith (Yalumba), Ross Brown (Brown Brothers) , Colin Campbell (Campbell’s), Chester Osborn (d’Arenberg), Darren DeBortoli (De Bortoli), Stephen & Prue Henschke (Henschke), Jeff Burch (Howard Park), Peter Barry (Jim Barry Wines), Scott McWilliam (McWilliam’s), Alister Purbrick (Tahbilk), Justin Taylor (Taylors/Wakefield), and Bruce Tyrrell (Tyrrell’s).

FOR TRADE: Speed Dating Trade Event 

Please join AFFW for a fast-paced tasting event to introduce Australia’s First Families of Wine.  11 multi-generational wine families have teamed up to showcase Australia’s rich wine heritage, celebrated wine stories and modern diversity.  In a speed-dating format, and against the clock, 11 winery hosts will each have just 5 minutes to introduce their winery, family and special wine to the group before the bell rings for rotation.  Following the hour long speed dating experience, guests will have the opportunity to mingle with their winery hosts for a walk-around tasting featuring additional wines from each winery.

May 18th, 2015 from 2.30pm – 5.00pm at the Press Club, San Francisco. REGISTER YOUR INTEREST HERE: http://affwunlocked.com.au/usa/san-francisco/

May 20th, 2015 from 2.30pm – 5.00pm at The Press Lounge – New York. REGISTER YOUR INTEREST HERE: http://affwunlocked.com.au/usa/new-york/

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Donna White
Donna White Communications 203 558 4262 donna@donnawhitepr.com

Angela Slade,Wine Australia Regional Director, North America, angela.slade@wineaustralia.com

ABOUT AUSTRALIA’S FIRST FAMILIES OF WINE:
Please visit: http://affwunlocked.com.au/ and www.affw.com.au
Join the conversation: Twitter @AFFWine and Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AFFW1

• Australia’s First Families of Wine (AFFW) initiative was launched in August 2009 at the Sydney Opera House
• AFFW launched in the UK in 2010, Canada in 2011, China in 2013 and runs an Australian program ‘Unlocked’
• The AFFW charter is to engage consumers, retailers, restaurateurs and industry colleagues around the globe to understand the quality of Australian wine, appreciate its character, and the personalities behind the brands
• Strict criteria to establish AFFW include being family controlled, having multiple generations involved in the business, ability to offer a tasting of 20+ vintages of their iconic wine, owner of established 50+ year old vineyard, best environmental practices throughout their businesses, and active involvement in the Australian wine industry bodies and organizations.
• Reference: Heart & Soul Australia’s First Families of Wine by Graeme Lofts with forward by James Halliday

 

How to Build a Loyal Fan Base for your Craft Beer, Wine, Spirit Brands?

Deciding on how to successfully approach your branding strategy is one of the most important aspects of building a cult following. Strategically using themes and motifs can
afford you the ability to sculpt your branding around your fan’s favorite content matter.

In this competitive industry of today, Beverage Brands are continually struggling to find
an identity, maintain their market share and grow their footprint. How can you stay on top and ensure you keep your customer base? Download white paper below that outlines how you can build a loyal fan base for your craft beer, wine or your spirit brand.

White_Paper

If you are a winery, brewery or a distillery looking to grow your wine distribution in Australia, get involved with AuTT Trade Tastings. 2015 Exhibitor Registration Now Open. Special Offer Ends May 31. Get Your Conference Ticket Included In Your Exhibiting Fee. Get Involved ASAP

Eventbrite - 2015 Australia Trade Tasting Exhibitor Portal

Looking To Find Wine Importers In Australia?

Finding import partners in Australia to take on your wine brands means first understanding the Aussie market and then targeting the best companies to work with. With no distribution tier restrictions between supplier and retailer like those of the three-tier system, wine distribution in Australia is a lot less complicated than in the US market.  However, determining how to best approach the Aussie market means working closely with teams on the ground and optimizing your brand for success.

Here are a few tips on how to garner attention for your wine brand and forge a successful partnership with Australian wine importers.

Address the Aussie Market

  • Invest in a local design agency
  • Invest in Research (Roy Morgan, Survey Monkey & media readership/subscriber lists for what consumers are the target audience IRi Aztec &LMAA for sales data)
  • Enter your wines in Aussie competitions and trade shows
  • Use authentic branding to tell your story

Understand Australian Distribution System

  • Australia is a 2 tier system
  • Parallel Importing is legal
  • Approximately 14000 On-Premise and 9000 Off-Premise Licensed Retailers
  • Over 40,000 Non-traditional licensed venues (clubs, cafes, restaurants, etc.)
  • Excise as an indirect tax
  • understand COGS, margin and retail pricing to ensure competitive offering
  • Consider local consultant professional
  • Decide on route to market

Sales and Marketing

Offer your importers a detailed marketing plan that shows that you are willing to do everything it takes to make your brand successful in Australia.  This means you need to present a solid outline of the following:

  • social media
  • events, meet the Vintners, dinners, festivals, etc.
  • eNewsletter
  • marketing budget allotment to Australia
  • PR
  • point of sale
  • merchandise
  • Retailer and Distributor Programs (in-store tastings, Buy 10 get 1 free, discounts, samples etc.)

To get you started, here is a List of Australian Wine Importers and their company profiles so you can target the right potential partners.

Echelon Wine Partners
Echelon proudly presents a portfolio of dynamic and innovative wines from some of the world’s finest wine producing regions. Every wine in the portfolio is modern in approach and expresses its origin.

World Wine Estates
World Wine Estates (WWE) is a wine importer and distributor that was established in 1988 as the import and wholesale arm of the Ultimo Wine Centre, Sydney’s famous premier wine retailer. WWE specialised in imported wines, especially French. The current owner and director, James Johnston, joined WWE in 1999. In 2005 by a mutual amicable agreement, WWE became a separate company to Ultimo Wine Centre.

Elite Wine Importers
Elite Wine Importers is currently a small family run business. It first began in 1994 when it was seen that there was a lack of Portuguese liquor products available to those of Portuguese decent and also for those who had travelled to Portugal and were hoping to find a taste of their holiday back here in Australia.

Living Wines
Living Wines is a Wine Importer in Australia of organic, biodynamic and natural wines from small producers in Europe. The wines are always low in sulphur and have no other additives.

Eurocentric Wine Imports
The goal of Eurocentric Wine Imports is to bring Australian drinkers great wine from Europe and European-styled wines from other regions such as New Zealand and South Africa in as good condition as if you drank them at the winery. The company is run by Neville Yates, a former career journalist who succumbed to his passion, embracing a combination of his loves — wine, people and travel. He meets the winemakers in the vineyards and in the cellars, tastes at the source, negotiates good deals, chooses reliable refrigerated transport and delivers to Australia great wines at a reasonable cost through the retailers, restaurants and wine bars you know and trust.

Grand Millesime Wine
Grand Millesime are specialist importers of fine French Wine. They are a young and energetic company who specialize in high quality wines, in particular the wines of Burgundy in France. They have a blossoming portfolio of hand-selected wines, all tasted at the domaine and selected based on quality. They travel to France several times a year to taste and buy and actively search out new, small and exciting producers.

Barrique Fine Wines imports
Barrique Fine Wines imports premium wines from France, with a particular emphasis on Burgundy. It is shipped straight to climate-controlled storage from where they send it direct to our clients’ home, offices, restaurants and bars.

Andrew Guard Wine Imports
Andrew Guard Wine Imports is a specialist importer and merchant of fine wine and spirits. It is owned and operated by Andrew and Kirsten Guard. Based in Sydney, Australia, thay have many years experience in the wine, restaurant and retail trade. The vignerons they represent are amongst the best in the world, producing very fine wines with minimal intervention that are reflective of their origins.

Vintage and Wine
Vintage & Vine is a small specialist importer and wholesaler of wines and spirits based in Sydney and started by Kevin Facey and David Burkitt in 2000.  The producers represented by Vintage & Vine are all chosen on the basis of quality, typicity and value. Quite simply this selection of wines represents not only the wines we enjoy but those that we feel to be among the very best from each region.

Corkscrew Cellars
Corkscrew Cellars is a group of independently owned and operated liquor retailers across Sydney. Being independent means they can provide a more personal approach to servicing your needs.Each store is as individual as the customers they serve and the products and services they provide.

Enoteca Sydney
Enoteca is a Sydney based wine company who import Italian, Austrian, French, German and Hungarian wines. They also sell a select few Australian and New Zealand wines.

Negociants Australia
Negociants Australia has been an importer of the world’s finest wines since 1984 and are proud to represent outstanding family owned wineries from Australia and abroad. Our dedicated and knowledgeable team of wine professionals is committed to the highest levels of customer service and quality representation of the wines that we are honoured to distribute. It is this combination of portfolio and people that makes Negociants Australia one of this country’s leading fine wine merchants.

Four Seasons Fine Wines
Four Seasons Fine Wines seeks to exceed the expectations of customers and principals with knowledge, integrity and service. They aspire to be an industry leading wine distribution company by representing and working with producers who articulate strong regional and quality excellence. These attributes combine to create a premium portfolio with diverse regional representation.

Looking for Aussie Importers?  Exhibit your brand at Australia Trade Tasting and get your brand in front of independent and chain buyers from leading retailers, importers and distributors.  Connect today at AuTT.

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What U.S. Wine Importers are Looking For

We are pleased to announce that Deborah M. Gray will be speaking at Australia Trade Tasting on ‘What U.S. Importers are Looking For & How To Keep Them Interested.’

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Deborah M. Gray, an Australian native and entrepreneur, founded her U.S. wine importing company, The Australian Wine Connection, in 1992 at a time when women wine business owners were scarce and knowledge of Australian wine was almost nonexistent in the U.S. Her first imports consisted of her family’s brand, The Cowra Estate, and a collection of small, family-owned vineyard brands. Deborah ultimately achieved broad national distribution with a diverse portfolio of iconic, highly rated Australian wines before selling her company in 2007.

Today, Deborah lives in Southern California where the emphasis in her company, Bluestone Wine Solutions, is on consulting and assisting others around the country with their importing needs and portfolios. Her second book, Wine Exporting to the U.S. – Strategies for Success, a comprehensive guide for the foreign wine supplier, will be published in 2015.

Come and Be Inspired by Deborah as she presents useful strategies and tips on “What U.S. Importers are Looking For & How To Keep Them Interested.”

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Don’t miss out on the remarkable content at Australia Trade Tasting this year. For More information on the great line-up of speakers at AuTT, please Click Here.

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Top 10 Distribution Tips For Local and Imported Craft Breweries in Australia

10 Tips for Beer Distribution in Australia

Looking to find new distribution partners in Australia for your Craft Brewery?

Wondering if you should open your own Brew Pub retail store or partner with large wholesalers?

David Lipman, founder of Beer & Brewer magazine and Drinks Hub, outlines ten top tips for distributing your craft beer in Australia.

With 3000+ local and imported beers regularly available in Australia and room for only 150 beer SKUs in a bottleshop, or 30 in a pub, does a craft brewery open their own retail venue to guarantee distribution, but lack volume, or go for volume in the wholesale market with lower margin and fierce competition? Beer Distribution in Australia has a lot less barriers to entry in the supply chain compared to the 3-tier system in the USA. However, with a small population and high production costs per carton compared to imported beer, local craft brewers really need to do their business planning prior to start-up to ensure the route to market chosen suits the target retail price, category/style of beer, brand story and cash flow of the business.

Distribution and excise are two of the most underestimated items in the business of brewing by craft breweries. 

1.       Have a quality product and credible brand identity/story/packaging

  • Invest in a consultant brewer or appoint a head brewer for the recipe development
  • Invest in a design agency for the packaging (label, cluster or other, cartons, bottle, decal, tap handles)
  • Invest in research (Roy Morgan and Survey Monkey or media readership/subscriber lists for e.g.) on what consumers are the target audience and sales data (IRi Aztec and the LMAA) on what styles and categories your beers will sit in (i.e. what are the best-selling beers in the regions and categories you are positioning your brand in.)
  • Enter your beers in competitions to prove quality as some retail beer buyers will buy based on gold medals and trophy winners even though consumers will rarely buy craft beer based on awards.  Consumers tend to buy based on occasion, price and the brand story most of the time.
  • Ensure the brand story is authentic, original, credible, and you have brand notoriety in your local market to prove its popularity. The brewer is the rock star and consumers love meeting the brewer while the region the brand is from (or the history or circumstance the brand was established) is important to promote the story. Don’t just focus on selling the brand based on quality and awards.

Heat is a major contributor to aging the beer, particularly in transit from brewery to retailer as it’s expensive to transport beer in cold-freight. Pasteurization heats up the packaged beer for a short period of time, it is not affected by heat in transit as much as an un-pasteurized beer. Craft beer is all about flavour; it’s a selling point to be unfiltered and unpasteurized. Pasteurization is said to remove 30% of flavour, however it all depends on your distribution model and the style of beer.

If you have a brew pub then there is no need for pasteurization as there is no time period from beer being transported from the brewery to the retailer and very little time sitting on a shelf or in a keg. However for the wholesale market, flash or tunnel pasteurization should be considered to control quality rather than let heat affect the beer for extended periods of time. Given beer is very rarely cold-freighted all the way from brewery door to the retailer shelf, the beer is not being consumed as the brewer intended. This is particularly the case for lagers, which are fermented at colder temperatures and affected by heat more than ales. The cardboard smell of heat affected beers is particularly noticeable in lagers that have little aroma or full-flavoured taste to hide behind.

2.       Understand Australian distribution (on- and off-premise), regulations, excise, and parallel importing

When the brewer understands the challenges, pressures, margins and price points of the importer/distributor and retailer, it makes the relationship and sell-in professional and respectful.

There are approximately 14,000 on-premise and 9,000 off-premise licensed outlets nationally. However, there are a lot more licensed venues when you include Restaurants, Clubs and Cafes. In NSW (18,000+) and Vic (20,000+) alone there are 38,000+ non-traditional licensed venues. Restaurants are a great target for craft beer. Given the beer lists are small, it makes the chance of getting picked by the consumer much better. Restaurants are also more willing to pay the listed wholesale price because they can mark the beer up more than bottleshops. Craft beer is all about pairing great beer with great food and restaurants also give the consumer that ultimate experience.

Parallel importing is legal in Australia, meaning an imported beer can be imported via a wholesaler and not the brewery. Retailers can buy direct from breweries and exporters, there is no 3-tier system like the USA.

Tap and Fridge Contracts exist in the on-premise and, with the average number of taps per pub being 8, venues are very limited in what they can put on tap outside the contracted brands. The opportunities for third parties (not in a contract) are guest taps, approaching freehouses with no contracts, or hoping the hoteliers catch on that customers are demanding more variety than what the contracted breweries are offering. The last opportunity hinges on the hotelier having not contracted out 70-100% of their taps, and hoping for 50% or less.

Given tap contracts, alternative routes to market are using growlers or stand-alone draught beer systems which provide the venue another tap point for the bar or event/function room.

Excise is an indirect tax as a fixed cost to draught and bottled beer. It goes up every 6 months by CPI. Its payable in seven days of leaving the brewery or bond store, even though it’s not paid for, for up to 90 days by retailers which can create a cash flow crisis for many craft brewers. There is an excise rebate for local microbreweries, up to $30,000 per annum received in the following financial year. Microbreweries are able to apply with the ATO to pay excise in 30 days rather than seven days. Many distributors or brewers will use a bond store to postpone payment of the excise until the beer is ordered and dispatched from the bonded site to allow maximizing production runs as well as minimize costs per carton and help margins and profitability.

3.       Understand COGS, margins and retail pricing for the category your beer sits in – are you competitive? Do you start contract brewing first or own equipment?

Distributors work off around 30% margins and retailers will buy cartons around a 25% margin while making around 40% on 6-packs and more on single bottle sales.

Repeat business is crucial to run a sustainable business. If your price is too high you run the risk of your beer being ordered once by consumers looking to try it one time before they move back to their regular, more affordable craft beers (known as repertoire drinkers.) However if you have low COGs or low fixed operating costs and are happy with less profit dollars, then higher prices can work if you sell the volumes needed to cover your costs.

The average retail price for a carton of local craft beer (any style, any ABV) in Australia is $64.50, whereas for imported craft beer its 13% higher at $74 per carton (8 litres). As mentioned in a previous article on the AuTT blog, the average ex-excise brewer wholesale price for imported craft beer is $17.50 and local craft beer is more like $35. Being 100% higher, local craft brewers are faced with a lot of competition from imported beer. However with the AUD/USA drastically softening (end of 2014) this will help local craft brewers’ price competitiveness.

Most consumers are purchasing craft beer as 6-packs, mixed 6-packs, or by the bottle. If you are pricing your beer to be sold above these prices then volumes will come down. It’s a matter of summing your COGs, the fixed operating costs you need to recoup, and your distributor and retailer margins to arrive at a retail price that is competitive against the mainstream craft or smaller craft brewers.

To work out excise here is the calculation: You need to find out the excise per litre of alcohol for kegs (>49.5 L) which is 40% less than kegs/bottles (less than 49.5 L).

Formula: Volume in Litres of the package x (Alcohol strength – 1.15) x Per Litre Cost of Alcohol.

E.g. from excise prices in February 2014

·         Carton of 24 x 330mL 4.3% ABV = 7.92 x (4.3-1.15) x $46.30 = $11.55+GST.

·         50 L keg of the same beer 4.3% ABV = 50 x (4.3-1.15) x $32.60 = $51.35+GST.

If price is important then you could contract brew to begin with, then once beer volumes get large enough you can invest in brewing equipment. This option allows the capital to be invested in sales teams, recipe development, packaging, promotion, travel, events, etc, and not sitting in stainless steel.

4.       Decide on the route to market and volumes to be profitable – wholesale or retail?

For the most part, this comes down to how much capital you have or can raise (for items in point 1),  how much profit you wish to make for shareholders, and if you going to work in the business with long hours or hire staff. The retail route is very profitable from a production and sell price perspective, while high costs in rent, staff, loadings, and other overhead such as marketing, is needed to ensure enough daily patronage. From a production point of view, you can make decent returns from producing 100,000 litres a year. On the other hand, if you go the wholesale route, you need to produce around 1-1.5 million litres a year to be sustainable and decide on owning equipment or contract brewing.

5.       Retail Distribution – Fresh beer and recruiting or partnering with a hospitality and marketing team to ensuring daily patronage

As mentioned in point 4, this is the most profitable form of selling craft beer and requires a fraction of the beer to be produced to be sustainable, as long as the venue itself is run efficiently and marketed to the local community. There are approximately 70 brewpub/breweries with hotel operating hours out of the 200 breweries in Australia.

Craft Beer Distribution in Australia

6.       Wholesale Distribution – Pasteurization and deciding on whether you will have a sales team, use a warehouse/logistics company, or appoint a distributor/retailer

As mentioned in point 4, given the costs of packaging and the fact that excise is 40% higher in bottles (unless you focus on 50L kegs, which is stifled by tap contracts), you need to brew a lot more beer to make the business sustainable.  See point 1 regarding considering pasteurization for the wholesale market, it’s a necessity for export.

There are three clear options in deciding the route to market for wholesale and they depend on your capital raising and how much volume you plan or need to achieve to meet profit targets:

(i)      Have your own sales team

This is the most ideal scenario.  As you have your own employees representing only your brand(s) in a highly competitive market, you know your brand is #1 on the list and #1 priority. The biggest obstacles in being able to use this route are having enough beer sales to support the sales team and a retailer or distributor’s insecurity in ccommitting to such large volumes with no track record, unless you have some serious ATL and BTL marketing budgets. A logical plan would be to start with point (ii) or (iii) then aim to get to have your own sales team in the medium to long term.

(ii)    Use a warehouse/logistics company with brand ambassador(s)

Start-ups with little budget or small overheads, can do the sales themselves, and grow the distribution organically, albeit over a longer period than point (iii) below. The important part of this route is to ensure you have warehouses on the east and west coast (given the sheer size of Australia) to store product close to customers. The reason for both warehouses is so that you can provide customer service with a short turnaround time from order to delivery and you can provide metro freight costs, rather than interstate freight costs. You will need to do the sales yourself, or appoint brand ambassadors/sales reps to generate the orders, for the warehouse/logistics company to pick/pack the orders for you. Consider if you can find bonded stores to warehouse your stock on the east and west coast, to help paying excise later. See point 7 below for a company list.

(iii)   Appoint a distributor/retailer

More and more these days, retailers are time poor and getting bombarded by sales reps from individual brand owners. Retailers will see around 40 reps a week for existing supply, let alone new brands/SKUs. Retailers prefer to talk to distributors who they already deal with that represent a number of brands all handled by the one account manager. This step ensures your brand is sitting in a portfolio that has relationships already in place. There are a number of distributors to choose, such as wine only (where you beer brand is their exclusive beer brand), a drinks distributor, or a dedicated craft beer distributor. It’s important, for any of these, that you ensure your brand doesn’t sit in the portfolio. You need to be continuously communicating with all reps looking after your brand.  Inform them of the product, its USPs, sales data success in other markets, awards, festivals/dinners at which customers can meet the brand team, sales targets, incentives and promotional support (as mentioned in point 9 below).  It’s a matter of asking what they need and what you can afford, to ensure volumes are met so that both you and the distributor are making profit.

Another option is go direct to the retailer as they can act as importer / distributor / retailer. This can be achieved via offering your brand exclusively to the retailer (if they are large enough), certain SKUs exclusive to the retailer, or brewing specific SKUs under an exclusive brand name for the retailer.  The last option gives them a lot of rapport with the beer to sell it, as it’s their own beer and they make more margin.

7.       Warehouse/Logistics Companies in Australia

Elite Logistics NSW www.elitewinelogistics.com.au
Warehousing & Distribution Solutions NSW www.wads.com.au
Locke Logistics Vic www.lockelogistics.com.au

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8.       Distributors in Australia

Type Distributor/Logistics Company State Web site
Beer Artisans of Amber NSW www.artisansofamber.com
Beer Beer Importers & Distributors National www.bidbeer.com
Beer Experienceit / Birra Italiana NSW www.birraitaliana.com.au
Beer Hops and More NSW bradflowers@hotmail.com
Beer Nordic Beverages (Balmain) NSW http://nordicbevs.com/
Beer Micro Beer Club NT www.microbeerclub.com.au
Beer Australian Trade Partners Qld www.australiantradepartners.com.au
Beer Calibre Craft Beer Trading Co Qld www.calibrebeer.com
Beer Europacific Liquor Pty Ltd Qld www.europacificliquor.com.au
Beer Fluid Boutique Liquor Qld www.fluidboutiqueliquor.com.au
Beer Decant Beer SA http://decantbeer.com/
Beer Palais Imports SA www.palaisimports.com.au
Beer Beer Importers & Distributors Vic www.bidbeer.com
Beer Better Beer Imports Vic www.betterbeerimports.com
Beer Boutique Beverage Distributors Vic www.boutiquebev.com.au
Beer Kaya Group for Efes Pilsener Vic www.kayagr.com
Beer Northdown, Craft Beer Movement Vic www.northdown.com.au
Beer Trumer Australia Pty Ltd Vic www.trumer-australia.com
Beer Beverage Australia Pty Ltd WA www.beverageaustralia.com.au
Beer PDH Imports WA phdimports@bigpond.com
Beer Trumer Australia WA www.trumer-australia.com
Beer/Cider DrinkWorks NSW www.drinkworks.com.au
Beer/Cider Phoenix Beers WA www.phoenixbeers.com.au
Beer/Cider The Beer & Cider Company WA www.beerandcider.com.au
BWS Bevchain National www.bevchain.com.au
BWS Bacardi Lion NSW ww.bacardilion.com
BWS Beach Ave Wholesalers NSW www.baw.com.au
BWS D’Aquin Group (NILWA) NSW www.daquinogroup.com.au
BWS Diageo Australia NSW www.diageo.com.au
BWS G H Cole & Son NSW www.nilwa.com.au
BWS Granduer Brew NSW www.grandeurbrew.com.au
BWS Kollaras NSW www.kollarasgroup.com
BWS LION Co NSW www.lionco.com.au
BWS Peter Doyle Cellars NSW www.nilwa.com.au
BWS Pure Beverages Pty Ltd NSW www.purebeverages.com.au
BWS Suntory (Aust) Pty Ltd NSW www.suntory.com.au
BWS Liquid Specialty Beverages Qld www.liquidsb.com.au
BWS Rivercity Wholesale Liquor Qld www.rivercity.com.au
BWS Empire Liquor SA www.empireliquor.com.au
BWS VOK Beverages SA www.vok.com.au
BWS Polkadot Liquor Tas www.polkadotliquor.com
BWS BDS Marketing Vic www.bdsmarketing.com.au
BWS Beach Ave Wholesalers Vic www.baw.com.au
BWS Enoteca Sileno Vic www.enoteca.com.au
BWS HT Beverages Vic www.htbeverages.com.au
BWS FM Liquor WA www.fmliquor.com.au
BWS Liquid Mix WA www.liquidmixwa.com.au
BWS Food Combined Wines and Foods NSW www.combinedwines.com.au
BWS Food Blackwood Lane Vic www.blackwoodlane.com
BWS Food Festival City Food & Liquor Vic www.festivalcitywines.com.au
Chinese BWS Food ETTASON Pty Ltd NSW www.ettason.com.au
Distributor ALM Liquor National www.almliquor.com.au
Distributor Hotel Liquor Wholesalers National www.bottlemart.com.au
Distributor ILG Co-operative Ltd NSW www.ilg.com.au
Distributor Paramount Liquor Vic www.paramountliquor.com.au
Distributor Premium Beverages Vic www.premiumbeverages.com.au
Distributor S & P Liquor NSW peterpizanis@optusnet.com.au
European BWS Urban Beverage Imports NSW www.urbanpurveyor.com/urban_imports
Hospitality Stirling Global Services NSW www.gohospitality.com.au
Japanese BWS Food Japan Food Corp NSW www.jfcaustralia.com.au
Logistics/Warehousing Elite Logistics NSW www.elitewinelogistics.com.au
Logistics/Warehousing Warehousing & Distribution Solutions NSW www.wads.com.au
Logistics/Warehousing Locke Logistics Vic www.lockelogistics.com.au
On-premise NILWA National www.nilwa.com.au
IBEV GLOBAL P/L Vic www.ibev.com.au
RTS The Daiquiri Group Qld www.daiquirigroup.com
Spanish wine/cider/beer Broadway Liquor NSW www.broadwayliquor.com.au
Whisky barmania! NSW www.barmania.com.au
Wine Red & White National www.redandwhite.com.au
Wine Bacchus Wine Merchant NSW www.bacchuswinemerchant.com.au
Wine Vintners NSW www.vintnersmerchants.com.au
Wine Off the Vine Wine Merchants SA www.offthevinewines.com
Wine Samuel Smith & Son (Yalumba Wine Company) SA www.samsmith.com
Wine Vintners Vic www.vintnersmerchants.com.au
Wine Dave Mullen Wine Agency WA
Wine Lionel Samson WA www.lionelsamsonandson.com.au
Wine/Beer Wines of Chile Pty Ltd NSW www.winesofchile.com.au
Wine/Beer Arquilla NSW/Vic www.arquilla.com
Wine/Beer Arquilla Vic www.arquilla.com
Oz North Food & Liquor Wholesalers Pty Ltd NT www.ozfcws.com.au
G&S Wasseige – Belgian Imports QLD
Australasian Imports Pty Ltd SA www.aimportg.com.au

9.       Promotion and Marketing

Support the distributor/retailer with social media, events, eNewsletter, marketing dollars, PR, point of sale, merchandise, in-store tastings, meet the brewer, dinners, festivals, samples, Buy 10 get 1 free, etc.

Join and support the industry associations (the retail association members are your prospective customers and helps you understand their challenges and opportunities). Some industry associations are: ALSA, CBIA, ARCBA, AHA, LMAA. Also see the retail associations for their member lists for retailer banner groups and retailers to target as sales prospects.

10.   Growing Pains/Customer Service – What contingencies are in place to cope with excess demand?

When the great thing happens of demand exceeding supply, what plans do you have for access to more capital for more fermenters and bright beer tanks. Rather than buying equipment, you could contract brew your excess demand. Don’t forget to go over all considerations for ensuring you don’t miss out on any sales and you can provide good customer service to existing and future customers.


 

By David Lipman, Founder Beer & Brewer Magazine and Drinks Hub.

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David Lipman Bio:

David’s passion for beer began in 2002 as a Cellarman at The Whitehorse on Parson’s Green and The Porterhouse Covent Garden, two institutions for great local and imported beer in London. In 2007 David founded Beer & Brewer magazine and www.beerandbrewer.com, and finished up as Publisher/Editor in May 2014. David has published as Editor-in-Chief five books on beer, including Ultimate Beer Guide Australia & NZ (2011), Craft Beer Trade Buyers Guide (2012), Breweries of Australia: A History 2nd Edn (2012), Best 100 Beers Australia (2013) and Beer Buyers’ Guide Australia & NZ (2013) www.beerbuyersguide.com.au. David has also published booklets on beer & food matching for Beer & Brewer magazine and BBQ School. David has launched three beer events including Beer & Brewer Expo (2009, Melbourne), Beer & Brewer Awards (2010, Sydney) and Beer & Brewer Conference (2012, Melbourne). These days David continues his passion hosting corporate tastings (including at the Sydney Opera House and Taste Festivals Australia). David has also just launched Drinks Hub, an exporter of Australian premium drinks, including craft beer, cider, spirits.

How can you Sell your Wine, Beer, and Spirits in the USA? Here’s A Brief Overview of the 3-Tier System.

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Are you looking for a guide on what it means for your Australian brewery, winery, or distillery to do business in the three-tier sales system in the USA?

The three-tier system was put into place after the abolition of Prohibition to control and regulate the distribution of adult beverages in the USA.  Production, importation, packaging and marketing are all federally regulated. Once federally approved for sale within the USA, further compliance with state distribution laws is necessary for market-entry anywhere in the USA.

The following article examines industry terminology used by suppliers, importers, wholesale distributors and retailers and outlines the role of each tier in the three tier system.

Here are some frequently used terms & abbreviations and their meanings for breweries, wineries and distilleries ready to start contacting importers, distributors and retailers in the USA:

FOB Price– Freight on Board: Supplier’s price (per case). The amount producers will get paid per case for their products. When talking about distributing their brand in their state, suppliers need to be ready by saying, “Its $54 per case FOB (New Jersey) / $4.50 per bottle.” When talking to a potential importer who plans to import their product, the FOB would be quoted as $36 per case FOB (Sydney) / $3 per bottle. If a supplier is picking the international freight tab they can quote $40 FOB (New York Port) to the importer.

On-Premise Retail: Bars, Clubs, Tasting Rooms, Brew Pubs, etc.  Any retail location where beverages are sold for consumption on premise.

Off-Premise Retail: Liquor Store, Chain Store, Box Store, etc.  Any retail location where beverages are sold for consumption off premise.

Call Frequency – How often a distributor rep visits a retail account

Control State – A state where sales are controlled directly by state-run establishments

SRP – Suggested Retail Price: Suggested final offer price to consumers in on-premise and off-premise accounts calculated using assumed mark-up percentages, as determined by market research by the supplier.

PTC – Price to Consumer.

PTD – Price to Distributor.

Margin – Based on sale price, this is usually reported as a profit percentage.

Markup – Based on cost, this is usually reported as a profit percentage.

Dry Shelf:  Retailer shelf that is not refrigerated

DTC – Direct to Consumer:  Any sale of beverage directly from the producer to the consumer.  Typically, this is done by local producers through internet sales, tasting rooms, fan clubs, events, etc.

FET – Federal Exercise Tax

Hand-Selling: The act of promoting and selling your beverage face-to-face.

Programming: Tastings, bottle-necks, marketing campaigns, etc.  Any promotional material you can provide to help market your beverage.

DI – Days Inventory: How many more days of inventory left of a certain product at a distributor warehouse.

Incentives: Coupons, discounts, free cases, give-backs, etc.  Any programs given to help promote sales in the three-tier system.

BTG – By The Glass: Price for beverage, offered by the glass at on-premise accounts.

Frontline Price: Highest listed retail price

Street Price: Lowest listed retail price

Retail Price:  Price listed by retailers to consumers.

 

An Overview of the 3-Tier Sales and Distribution System.

 

Supplier Sales

In this sales tier, the supplier (winery, brewery, distillery, producer, or importer) sets the distributor’s FOB, which is the only price that the supplier has any direct control over.  Suppliers can influence the PTC through give-backs, discounts and promotions, but ultimately the price offered by distributors to retailers (wholesale price) and the PTC is in the hands of the distributor and retailer. Depending on the FOB paid, distributors have a good understanding of what SRP will be for retail accounts and will go-to-market accordingly.

Australian wineries, distilleries and breweries are required by federal law to enlist the services of a registered importer.  Once the product has cleared customs and is state side, the importer and supplier begin marketing the product to distributors.

Instead of soliciting distributors directly, Australian suppliers often engage an agent or consultant company to broker sales and provide marketing support to distributors.  Often, the firm will have importers and distributors that they work with to establish a solid market-entry strategy for new beverages.  These representatives must be fully licensed in the states you are planning on entering.

Even if you plan on selling ‘out-of-state,’ compliance with state laws is a must when working with state importers, brokers, distributors and retailers.   The costs and complexities of compliance vary considerably from state-to-state, so plan market-entry accordingly.

 

Distributor Sales

Once purchased, the distributor warehouses supply until further delivery to retail partners.  Freight, storage, and operating costs, as well as mark-up, will all be added to the wholesale price (note that some states have regulatory mark-up margins).

Even though the supplier does not have overall control of the price offered to retailers, often they are expected to provide incentive programs (tastings, promotional campaigns, etc.) in target markets to help build customer recognition, create a competitive offering and ultimately deplete stock at retail accounts. Both Distributors and consultancy firms will have reps working to help sales for your beverage, but you will need to provide incentive programs to really encourage them to concentrate on your brand.  Beyond incentives for your distribution tier reps, in order for successful market entry you will personally need to employ a team dedicated to support programs at retail accounts.

Some distributors are ‘multi-state’ or ‘national,’ which means their distribution network spans across various states and each branch of their company specializes in compliance for the state they operate in. Depending on the state, some wholesale distributors can also hold import licenses.

Working with national distributors or wholesale distributors with import licenses can sometimes simplify the import process in the three tier system, but it does not mean you will not be required to provide incentive programs, support programs and marketing campaigns to go along with those provided by your distributor reps. No matter what state you enter and with what import and distribution partners, be prepared to build a healthy market for your beverages.

 

Retail Sales

Retail sales are separated into two main account types – on-premise and off-premise. Retailers will buy stock from distributors at the wholesale price where-upon the product will be distributed to the retail store for further sale to the consumer.  Each state regulates retail sales and each set of laws, licenses and taxes, for both on-premise and off-premise accounts, varies from state-to-state considerably.

Chain and box stores often receive the best pricing and volume deals (incentives) from wholesalers while independent retailers work hard to market their offerings (variety, POP, POS, support programs, etc.)  Depending on what type of distributor you are working with, you will need to be able to service the type of retail partners they work with.

Independent retailers typically need to price their offerings higher (approximately 25%-50% margin) because they are unable to sell at the volume that Chain and Box stores (20%-45% margin) can.

Breweries, Wineries, Distilleries and Suppliers often have a SRP that they want to see as a final listing price at the retail level, but they seldom have any direct control over the final PTC.  Depending on any discounts, incentives, % mark-up, compliance factors, programming, marketing, and promotional campaigns that has gone into getting the product to market, the retail price can be dramatically different from that of a supplier’s initial SRP.

On-premise retail accounts are usually limited to selling to consumers by-the-glass, or by the bottle, and for consumption at their establishment only. Some states allow on-premise accounts to sell to consumers for off-premise consumption and some even allow securely sealed, opened bottles to leave the premise.  Support programs (promotional give-aways, merchandising, etc.) are also highly encouraged to build customer bases at important on-premise locations.

Depending on state laws, some wineries, breweries , distilleries and suppliers can sell direct-to-consumer (DTC).  This is often limited to producers selling directly to consumers at tasting rooms and brew pubs or at events, but DTC internet clubs directly associated with the producer are very popular in states where it is permitted.

For a good pricing overview for the USA market, please read Three Tier System and Pricing Overview for USA Market 

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Are you a winery, brewery or distillery looking to export your beverages to the USA?  Come network at Australia Trade Tasting and grow your brand.

Specialist Wine Retailers in Australia

On this page we have compiled a list of Specialist Wine Retailers in Australia.

Specialist Wine Retailers in Australia

Heathcote Wine Hub

With at least 24 wines on taste every day, the Heathcote Wine Hub is the ideal place to enjoy, compare, understand and purchase mixed wines from the many great wineries of the Heathcote region.

The Heathcote Wine Hub is Heathcote’s regional Tasting Centre, offering tasting and sales of wine from most of the producers in the region.

If you’re seeking a deeper knowledge, the staff and owners of the Heathcote Wine Hub are only too pleased to take you on a guided tasting tour of the region where you can experience, at the one location, the diversity of wines produced in the region. In particular, Heathcote is renowned for producing outstanding shiraz, ranging from lighter easy-drinking, savoury and elegant styles, through to rich and complex tastings. It also is fast gaining a reputation for other varieties, which can be explored in store such as sangiovese, nebbiolo, tempranillo, Rhône and Spanish-style blends, fiano, vermentino, viognier and marsanne.

Armadale Cellars

Armadale Cellars only stocks the best – and they’ve taken the guess work out of the equation for you. They stock wines that they have personally tasted, and that have passed their test for quality, complexity and value.

Red, white; young, old; New World or Old World; sweet or dry – whatever style you’re looking for – and at whatever budget, Armadale Cellars has the perfect drop.

Life is too short to drink anything but good wine. Enjoy!

Bonds Corner Fine Wine

At Bonds Cnr Fine Wine they want you to feel like you can take time out to immerse yourself in their range of wines of all styles, vintages and price points from around the world. Whether you’re looking for something fun and easy for tonight, a unique gift, or something to go with that special dinner, they will help you find it at Bonds Cnr Fine Wine.

At Bonds Cnr Fine Wine all of their products, from their craft beer and small batch spirits, to their extensive selection of small production wines, have been personally selected by John. Not only is he the big guy behind the counter, he’s also an internationally qualified Sommelier, adventurous home cook, passionate wine drinker and all-round nice guy.

Wine Republic

Wine Republic is an exciting new boutique wine, beer and liquor retail store located on the iconic Brunswick Street in Fitzroy, Melbourne

Carrying one of the largest ranges of independent wine and beer producers in Australia, their large and growing selection boasts over 1,500 varieties of wine and 300 beers and ciders.

Chalk and Cheese

Customer service. That’s what they’re about, the customer. As a small, local, independent retailer their customers mean everything to them. They are passionate about what they do. So if you haven’t visited a Chalk and Cheese store, drop in and let them show you around.

La Cantina – Il Mercato

A new development for Imma & Mario’s Mercato in Campbelltown, Adelaide, is their wine cellar. ‘La Cantina’, features Italian wines of regionality and authenticity from small family growers known for their care in vineyard and winery. Much of the range is exclusively imported by Mercato, a family business with over 40 years of both servicing South Australia’s Italians and in introducing the Italian taste to a wider audience.

Moncur Cellars

Specialising in difficult to source boutique wines and classics, Moncur Cellars is also the perfect place to stock up for dinner parties, special occasions or when adding to your private cellar. Professional and helpful staff are always on hand and happy to answer your questions.

You’ll also find an excellent range of good value wines, chilled beers, imported spirits and special bottle shop offerings and the fine food section at the front of the store – stocked with goodies .

 Blackhearts & Sparrows

Blackhearts & Sparrows independent wine stores make the world of wine accessible to all. They view great wine, beer and cider as more than just a drink: great wine brings people together.

Established in 2005 by Paul and Jessica Ghaie – siblings with a thirst for all things fermented – Blackhearts & Sparrows stores feel like home. Stocked with a wide range of hand-selected products from Australia and abroad, everything has been tasted by the team before it hits the shelves. At Blackhearts & Sparrows they have built strong relationships with wine makers and brewers, and they champion the small and unique, the weird and wonderful, and the downright delicious. They enjoy nothing more than finding the right bottle for you.

Wine Emporium

The Wine Emporium is a world-class retail store of fine wine. The Wine Emporium offers an outstanding range of premium Australian and imported wine. The store was established in March 2005, with the goal of assembling the best range, the best staff and the best shopping experience in Australia. With weekly free in-store tastings, regular special events and wine dinners, and a comprehensive education program.

Gasworks Cellar Door

Gasworks Cellards proudly supports over 81 locals vineyards including 300 wines sourced from wineries across Tasmania.  Experience Tasmanian wines from the heart of Hobart.

Enjoy an environment that offers an interpretive experience with tasting and retail opportunities.

The Prince Wine Store

Established in 1997 as part of the re-development of the Prince of Wales Hotel in St Kilda, Prince Wine Store is devoted to offering their customers an eclectic mix of wines in combination with knowledgeable service and competitive pricing.

In 2004 partners Philip Rich, Michael McNamara and Alex Wilcox opened a second store at 177 Bank Street, South Melbourne . Housing an ever-increasing range of wines in a purpose built climate-controlled environment, one can expect to find both a huge range of affordable drinking alternatives alongside benchmark producers.

Harvest Wine & Liquor

Harvest Wine & Liquor is an independent owned boutique bottleshop located in the hub of Northcote, Melbourne. Being an independent business means that they can offer their patrons more unusual varieties of alcohol that you won’t find at huge commercial stores. They regularly update their selection of products and are constantly on the lookout for lesser known labels that are exceptional in quality and affordable in price.

 

 

Wine Trade Events in Australia

We’ve Compiled a list of Wine Trade Events in Australia.  Get Connecting with industry Proffesionals at these Great Events!

WineTech 2015

WineTech 2015WineTech, the Australian wine industry’s premier tradeshow, will return to Adelaide in a dynamic new format in 2015.

This event has a history of showcasing the latest innovations and developments along with proven products and services supporting the Australian and international wine industries.

Wine Industry Suppliers Australia Inc. (WISA) will present WineTech 2015 in a new partnership with Kym Jones Exhibitions, one of Australia’s most experienced trade and public exhibition organisers.

532 Marion Road, Plympton Park SA 5038.  T: 08 8297 1688 – F: 08 8297 0855 – E: info@kjex.com.au

 

Australian Wine Industry Trade Exhibition 2015

Australian Wine Trade Exhibition

Australia Wine Industry Trade Exhibition is a trade exhibition that provides wine industry professionals with the opportunity to network face-to-face.

Keep abreast of the latest products and services available for the production of wine. AWITE is produced by Reed Exhibition.

AWITE takes place July 25-27, 2016,  at the Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide, SA, Australia

Reed Exhibitions has a global network of 34 offices, as well as a growing number of alliances around the world.  You can contact AWITE here: Reed Exhibitions Contact Info & Website

 

Dan Murphys National Wine Show

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Dan Murphys National Wine Show will be one of the best events dealing with the finest wines from all over Australia.

This event will be held at Australia for 12 consecutive days. This event will also hold a judging session that will help the visitors to know more about the finest wine and brandy available. The exhibitors who are going to take active participation in this event are those expert professionals and wine makers who can exhibit products related with premium, sparkling wines and brandy, different types of world classes wine and brandy products, Table Wines, Sparkling Wines, Sweet White Fortified and Ruby or Vintage Fortified Wines. Dan Murphys National Wine Show will provide a good business platform for the exhibitors and visitors to come and meet at one place and build a good professional relationship with each other.

PO Box 124 MITCHELL ACT 2911. P: (02) 6241 2478 – F: (02) 6241 1712 – E: seo@rncas.org.au

 

Australia Trade Tasting

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Australia Trade Tasting is an annual trade event showcasing exciting wines, beers and spirits from all over the world to Australian importers, distributors, retailers and press.

Learn from some of the most influential professionals in the beverage industry at the Australia Trade Tasting educational conference on 1st September, 2015 and 2nd September. These presentations from industry leaders on today’s leading ideas on marketing, sales and distribution will challenge and inspire you to grow your beverage company.

Exhibit your brand at Australia Trade Tasting and get in front of Australia’s leading importers, important distributors, high-profile retail merchants, and influential media executives.

 

Taste Of Melbourne

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Taste of Melbourne is the ideal meeting podium for the food and beverage industries.

The event is one of the biggest shows in the entire region. The exhibitors find this exhibition to be the perfect business meeting place where the exhibiting companies get an opportunity to establish themselves and create their own brand name as they demonstrate the exclusive collection of the desired food items, and demonstrate their cooking talents and art of cocktail making. Melbourne’s award winning chefs of Bertolli Taste Kitchen will cook up to share the secrets of their favourite dishes and will offer some useful tips to the taste lovers. Malaysia Kitchen Australia will also arriving to give a real taste of mMalasia to the visitors.

Exhibiting enquiries: Simon Wilson.  T: + 61 (0)2 9332 9000 – E: simonw@brandevents.com.au

 

 AUSPACK 2015

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AUSPACK is the largest biennial packaging and processing machinery and materials exhibition in Australia.

It was created to showcase packaging three decades ago when several local machinery manufacturers established an Association known as the Australian Packaging Machinery Association (APMA) to run their own exhibition as they believed the packaging industry needed a specialised trade exhibition for packaging and processing machinery.

Malcolm Miller of National Packaging was the original visionary and invited Bob Brook of Bud Pak, Bill Juknitis of Advance Machinery, David Tierney of Heat and Control and Barton Porter of Inteco Australia, to work together to develop an exhibition worthy for the Australian and New Zealand market. Thus AUSPACK was born.

AUSPACK takes place March 24-27, 2015 at the Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Center.

Anne-Marie Mina, Event Executive.  T: +61 2 9556 7993 – E: ammina@etf.com.au

 

Agfest 2015

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Agfest is a multi-award winning event and offers an excellent opportunity for your business to showcase its products to thousands of people.

After the success of the World Ploughing, a committee of 30 past and present Rural Youth members was formed and the first Agfest was held in May, 1983 at Symmons Plains, Perth. The first event attracted a total of 111 exhibitors and 9,000 patrons and was a 2-day event. Agfest became a 3-day event from 1984.

Closing date for all applications is 1st December, 2014 and any completed applications received after this date will automatically be placed on the waiting list for a cancellation and will be subject to a 10% surcharge.

Agfest takes place on the 7th, 8th & 9th of May, 2015

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